Thursday, July 31, 2008

Baby tomatoes!!!

These are two baby Purple Cherokee tomatoes -- I love the long green, lash-like leaves that spread from the top of the fruit. Hanging from below are the spent blossoms. Up above and to the right, you can see another yellow flower that will soon become a tomato!

These are the black Krim babies that had already started before the tomato food fiasco. If they will only ripen, I can harvest the seeds...I had to amputate the dead bottom of the plant and then plant the top part into the ground with a generous splash of rooting hormone.

Here is a view of the Cuore di Bue plant that survived. It has two baby tomatoes and several blossoms...

Another view...

You can already see the striations on the surface of the oddly-shaped Cuore di Bue...

A volunteer plum tomato that sprouted by my grape vine, all tangled in the vine.

And some volunteer cherry tomatoes...

2 comments:

Dcn Scott Dodge said...

I am rooting for you new little tomatoes!

Suzanne said...

They're still going strong... Thanks for looking out for them.

Dumbstruck by the Mystery

...our temptation is always to impose our prejudices or our measure on reality -- except when we are faced with a fact that leaves us dumbstruck, and instead of dominating the fact ourselves, we are dominated, overcome by it. If there were no moments of this kind, the Mystery could do anything, but in the end, we would reduce everything to the usual explanation. But not even a Nobel Prize winner can stop himself from being dumbstruck before an absolutely gratuitous gesture. If there were not these moments, we would find answers, explanations, and interpretations to avoid being struck by anything. It is good that some things happen that we cannot dominate, then we have to take them seriously, and this is the great question of philosophy. If the conditions for the possibility of knowledge (see Kant) impose themselves on reality or if there is something that is so powerfully disproportionate that it does not let itself be "grasped" by the conditions of possibility, then the horizon opens. If this were not the case, then we could dominate everything and be in peace, or at least without drama. Instead, not even the intelligence of a Nobel Prize winner could prevent him from coming face-to-face with a fact that made him dumbstruck -- instead of dominating, it was he who was dominated. Here begins the drama, because I am called to answer. It is the drama that unfolds between us and the Mystery, through certain facts, certain moments, in which the Mystery imposes itself with this evidence. These are facts that we cannot put in our pocket, which we cannot reduce to antecedent factors.
-- Julian Carron in "Friends, that is, Witnesses."